=Report= Mud Dyeing on Nishinoshima, Oki Islands

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On my summer vacation to the Oki Islands last year (which was fantastic in so many ways), I took two half-days to try out an art project: mud dyeing.

Akao lookout kuniga coastIt was something I decided rather randomly. I showed up on Nishinoshima having only decided that I wanted to see horses (and I saw lots of horses), but I had no plan for the next day. The tourism information office directly across from the ferry port was extremely helpful, and has lots of information lined up to answer my “what shall I do?” question. Not only did they give me suggestions, but they made all the reservations for me. That’s also how I suddenly wound up SCUBA diving the following morning.


Following my dive and my seafood lunch, I went out to start my art project. Mud dyeing starts with bright red rocks like this, one of the many, many geological features in this UNESCO Geo-Park.

brittany oki

It’s broken up into even brighter pieces like this, which we use for the dye. You can also make it into clay for pottery.

It can be used to dye many differents of fabrics, I was sticking with a very simple weave that would make the color show up really well for a tie-dye effect. I enjoyed trying out a bunch of different ways of folding and tying the cloths so that I could see what sort of effects I’d get, but if I were ever to do this again, I’d probably start with a pattern in mind and attempt to stick to it.

 

As you can see in these charcoal tie-dyes, you can do a lot of cool stuff with it if you have some clue what you’re doing.

brittany OKI

After binding the parts of the cloth you want to leave undyed, you work the mud water into it…

…and then hang it out to dry.

The following day, I returned to finish up. Usually, in order to get a very deep color, you’d want to leave them out longer before giving them a salt water rinse, but in the interest of time we sped up the process a bit. Off to the beach we went!

brittany oki

brittany oki

The water was super clear and you could see lots of tiny fish until you rinsed the cloths and the muddy color clouded about. While out there in the sun, the lady who taught to do this and I had a fun conversation about her sudden decision to move from Gifu to the Oki Islands after seeing a segment about them on TV, and about how pleasant it is to live among both mountains and the sea. (Later, she also made me lunch, drove me to the port, and just when I thought we had said good-bye, she came back and asked if I wanted ice cream. So we had ice cream together, too.)
While giving them a little more time to dry in the sunshine before packing them up and taking them with me, I took a stroll around the area to see the greenery, the flowers, and the water.

 

My “designs” turned out kind of cool, but very uncoordinated.
That’s okay. I went to the islands to enjoy going with the flow and doing things in the moment instead of trying to stick to a plan.

Written by Ms. Brittany Partin

Fabric Dyeing (Oki clay)

Takuhi Kiln

Try dyeing white fabric (two cotton towels or handkerchiefs) with dye made from local soil. If you have something you would like to dye, please bring it with you.

Address : 973 Mita, Nishinoshima-cho
Opening Hours : 9:00 – 17:00 (Closed Wednesdays)
Duration : About two years
Fee : Pottery Wheel Course – 2000 yen/person (two hours)
English flyer is available [PDF]
Reservation
Reservations are essential. Please make your reservation by email: kuniga@chive.ocn.ne.jp

 

 

This article was written by CIR (Coordinator of International Relations) of Matsue Local Government who experienced Japanese Culture. Please Click the banner below to see her blog.
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